Dec 142010
 

Yesterday was beautiful as promised. The outlook is up in the air

RECORD EVENT REPORT...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FLAGSTAFF, AZ
818 PM MST MON DEC 13 2010

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES FOR NORTHERN ARIZONA ON DEC 13 2010...

CITY                                NEW HIGH      PREVIOUS RECORD/YEAR
BELLEMONT                              65          57         IN  2004
COTTONWOOD-TUZIGOOT NM                 76          70         IN  1996
FLAGSTAFF                              67          66         IN  1921
FORT VALLEY                            65          64         IN  1950
GREER                                  64          59         IN  2004
HEBER                                  68          67         IN  1969
NAVAJO NM                              56          54         IN  1962
PAYSON                                 69          68         IN  1969
SELIGMAN                               73          70         IN  1950
SHOW LOW                               67          63         IN  2004
GRAND CANYON SOUTH RIM                 63          62         IN  2004
WALNUT CANYON                          60          57         IN  2004

THE HIGH TEMPERATURE AT THE SEDONA AIRPORT TODAY REACHED 70 DEGREES.
THE OFFICIAL RECORD HIGH FOR TODAY IS 70 DEGREES...WHICH WAS SET AT
THE RANGER STATION IN 2004.

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES FOR NORTHERN ARIZONA ON DEC 12 2010...

CITY                                NEW HIGH       PREVIOUS RECORD/YEAR
BELLEMONT                              60          60         IN  2004
COTTONWOOD-TUZIGOOT NM                 75          70         IN  1996

THESE RECORDS ARE PRELIMINARY PENDING OFFICIAL REPORTS.

The outlook is a little uncertain. Just as the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model has firmed up on a strong storm hitting the area on Thursday, the National Weather Service has moved to a fairly light 1-2 inches of snow in their forecast. Accuweather has dropped snow from their forecast. The NOGAPs model shows only a small amount of precipitation. The GFS Model shows light amounts in Northern Arizona, with heavier amounts to the south. So, which is right? I think it mostly depends on the positions of the High and Low pressure systems off the Pacific Coast. I think the graphic below captures the situation. If the pump isn’t directed at us, we get very little. If it is directed at us we get a lot.

Check Out Ken Clark’s Blog at AccuWeather. He notes the potential pineapple connection. Very nice discussion and images.

Storm Pump

Storm Pump

Stu

 Posted by at 7:09 am

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