Dec 302009
 
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December continues to be very cold. This won’t change this week. But, after another possible small storm early next week, we are in for a warming trend. But, only in the West. We should see temperatures reaching and surpassing the 50 degree F mark through the first half of January. The storm door will probably slam shut for a while as well.

The rest of the country, and possible most of the Northern Hemisphere is in for a very cold time. Here is a quote from Joe Bastardi at Accuweather.com:

What is facing the major population centers of the northern hemisphere is unlike anything that we have seen since the global warming debate got to the absurd level it is now, which essentially has been there is no doubt about all this. For cold of a variety not seen in over 25 years in a large scale is about to engulf the major energy consuming areas of the northern Hemisphere. The first 15 days of the opening of the New Year will be the coldest, population weighted, north of 30 north world wide in over 25 years in my opinion.

The quote is underneath the post on CO2. The Eastern US didn’t see a warm fall, either.  There seems to be wide agreement that this is the early January model. Here is the 6-10 day temperature outlook from the Climate Prediction Center.

6-10 Temperature Outlook for Jan. 4-8, 2010

6-10 Temperature Outlook for Jan. 4-8, 2010

This is due to strong negative Arctic Oscillation and North Atlantic Oscillation. Both work together to bring colder temperatures to the Eastern United States and much of Northern Europe. The dominating factor currently is very strong high pressure over the Artic Ocean. Their effects are remarkably similar.

Here is a good single-page graphic on the Arctic Oscillation: Arctic Oscillation (PDF at Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean).

Here is a link to a discussion about North Atlantic Oscillation: North Atlantic Oscillation (at Columbia University)

Finally, both the Artic and the North Atlantic Oscillations are forecasted to remain strongly negative for the next few weeks.

Arctic Oscillation Outlook

Arctic Oscillation Outlook

North Atlantic Oscillation Outlook

North Atlantic Oscillation Outlook

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